7th (1969): “New Site, Same Scene” Show Notes

Table of Contents: Description, Corrections/Clarifications, Housekeeping, General, Main Slate, Ephemera, Recurring Directors, Recurring Countries, One-Time Directors, Debuts, Festivals/Oscar Nominees, Events/Shorts, Discussions By Length, Specifications

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Description
The seventh episode of the Catalyst and Witness podcast, devoted to exploring the films and format of the New York Film Festival, hosted by Ryan Swen and Dan Molloy. This covers the seventh edition of the festival in 1969, and features special guest Caden Mark Gardner, critic and co-publisher of Body Talk.

0:00-21:56 – Opening
21:57-1:21:11 – Part One [Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice to Boy]
1:21:12-2:27:41 – Part Two [Adalen 31 to My Night at Maud’s]
2:27:42-3:13:51 – Part Three [The Merry Widow to HE Who Gets Slapped]
3:13:52-4:00:43 – Part Four [Le Gai Savoir to Oh! What a Lovely War]
4:00:44-4:09:52 – Closing

Corrections/Clarifications

  • N/A

Housekeeping

  • Hosted by Dan Molloy & Ryan Swen
  • Special Guest Caden Mark Gardner
  • Conceived and Edited by Ryan Swen
  • Recorded in Los Angeles, Portland, and Schenectady on MacBook GarageBand, Edited in Audacity
  • Podcast photograph from Yi Yi, Logo designed by Dan Molloy
  • Poster by Marisol Escobar
  • Recorded August 28, 2018
  • Released August 31, 2018
  • Music (in order of appearance):
    • Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (opening night)
    • La Ronde (another favorite)
    • Boy (favorite of the first section)
    • My Night at Maud’s (favorite of the second section)
    • Destroy, She Said (favorite of the third section)
    • Mandabi (favorite of the fourth section)
    • Oh! What a Lovely War (closing night)

General

  • Selection Committee: Richard Roud (program director), Penelope Huston, Arthur Knight, Andrew Sarris, Susan Sontag, Henri Langlois (retrospective consultant)
  • Location: Alice Tully Hall
  • Prices: 2.25 and 3.50 for orchestra, 4.50 for loge
  • Films seen for the podcast:
    • Ryan
      • Seen before podcast watching period: Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, Le Gai Savoir
      • Seen for the podcast: All available except The Deserter and the Nomads and One Fine Day; Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice rewatched
      • Favorite films: My Night at Maud’s, Boy, La Ronde, Une femme douce, Destroy, She Said, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
      • Least favorite films: Goto, Island of Love
      • Seen after the podcast: One Fine Day (8th)
    • Dan
      • Seen before podcast watching period: Une femme douce, Boy, My Night at Maud’s
      • Seen for the podcast: All available except Oh! What a Lovely War; Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice and La Ronde rewatched
      • Favorite films: Boy, My Night at Maud’s, Destroy, She Said, La Ronde, Adalen 31
      • Least favorite films: Porcile, Goto, Island of Love, The Deserter and the Nomads
    • Caden
      • Seen before podcast watching period: Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, Une femme douce, Boy, La Ronde, My Night at Maud’s, Le Gai Savoir
      • Seen for the podcast: All available except Oh! What a Lovely War; My Night at Maud’s rewatched
      • Favorite films: Boy, Une femme douce, My Night at Maud’s, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
      • Least favorite films: The Deserter and the Nomads
  • Discoveries of the festival: Destroy, She Said, Adalen 31, Oh! What a Lovely War
  • Unavailable films: The Lady From Constantinople, Pierre and Paul

Main Slate

Opening Night: Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969, Paul Mazursky)
September 16, 6:30
Released 1969
The Joke [Žert] (1969, Jaromil Jires)
September 17, 6:30
Released 1970
Une femme douce [A Gentle Woman] (1969, Robert Bresson)
September 17, 9:30
Released 1971
The Lady From Constantinople [Sziget a szárazföldön] (1969, Judit Elek)
September 18, 6:30
Never released
The Rite [Riten] (1969, Ingmar Bergman)
September 18, 9:30
Never released
Boy [Shōnen] (1969, Nagisa Oshima)
September 19, 6:30
Released 1970
Adalen 31 (1969, Bo Widerberg)
September 19, 9:30
Released 1969
The Epic That Never Was (1965, Bill Duncalf)
September 20, 12:00 AM
Never released
Lions Love (1969, Agnès Varda)
September 20, 9:30
Released 1969
Pierre and Paul [Pierre et Paul] (1969, René Allio)
September 21, 1:00
Never released
La Ronde (1950, Max Ophuls)
September 21, 9:30
Released 1954
My Night at Maud’s [Ma nuit chez Maud] (1969, Eric Rohmer)
September 23, 9:30
Released 1970
Retrospective: The Merry Widow (1925, Erich von Stroheim)
September 24, 6:30
Released 1925
Duet for Cannibals [Duett för kannibaler] (1969, Susan Sontag)
September 24, 9:30
Released 1969
Destroy, She Said [Détruire, dit-elle] (1969, Marguerite Duras)
September 25, 9:30
Released 1970
Goto, Island of Love [Goto, l’île d’amour] (1969, Walerian Borowczyk)
September 26, 9:30
Never released
Retrospective: HE Who Gets Slapped (1924, Victor Sjöström)
September 27, 1:00
Released 1924
Le Gai Savoir [Joy of Learning] (1969, Jean-Luc Godard)
September 27, 6:30
Released 1970
The Deserter and the Nomads [Zbehovia a pútnici] (1968, Juraj Jakubisko)
September 27, 9:30
Never released
Porcile [Pigsty] (1969, Pier Paolo Pasolin)
September 28, 6:30
Never released
Mandabi [The Money Order] (1968, Ousmane Sembène)
September 29, 9:30
Released 1970
One Fine Day [Un certo giorno] (1968, Ermanno Olmi)
September 30, 9:30
Never released
“Closing Night”: Oh! What a Lovely War (1969, Richard Attenborough)
October 2, 6:30
Released 1969

Ephemera

  • “The National Film Collection”: 23 programs of American films from the National Film Collection at the Library of Congress, shown at the Library and Museum of Performing Arts in Lincoln Center, all free
  • “Avant-Garde West”: 9 programs of films by West Coast filmmakers, shown at the Library and Museum of Performing Arts in Lincoln Center, all free
  • “Open Programs”: 15 programs of features and shorts of all categories, shown at the Library and Museum of Performing Arts in Lincoln Center, all free
  • “Jean Renoir: A One-Man Show”: a virtually complete retrospective of Renoir’s films, shown in five series at the Library & Museum of the Performing Arts in Lincoln Center

Recurring Directors
Key: films in this iteration excluding shorts/omnibus/retrospectives, films in this iteration including, films in the festival up to this point excluding, films up to this point including, number of gala spots (when applicable), number of festivals with more than one film shown (when applicable); † indicates their last appearance, fraction in parentheses indicates number of features shown from oeuvre, features released in the eligible timeframe, features in oeuvre

  • Jean-Luc Godard: 1/1/11/15/2/5
  • Robert Bresson: 1/1/4/4
  • Pier Paolo Pasolini: 1/1/2/4/0/1
  • Agnès Varda: 1/1/3/3/1
  • René Allio: 1/1/3/3†(3/10/10)
  • Bo Widerberg: 1/1/3/3
  • Ermanno Olmi: 1/1/2/2
  • Jaromil Jires: 1/1/1/2†(1/22/22)
  • Eric Rohmer: 1/1/1/2
  • Ingmar Bergman: 1/1/1/1
  • Walerian Borowczyk: 1/1/1/1
  • Marguerite Duras: 1/1/1/1
  • Nagisa Oshima: 1/1/1/1
  • Ousmane Sembène: 1/1/1/1
  • Max Ophuls: 0/1/0/2
  • Erich von Stroheim: 0/1/0/2

Recurring Countries
Key: films in this iteration excluding shorts/retrospectives, films in this iteration including, films in the festival up to this point excluding, films up to this point including, number of gala spots (when applicable)

  • France: 6/7/41/52/4
  • Sweden: 3/3/8/8
  • USA: 2/4/16/27/1
  • Italy: 2/2/16/20/1
  • Czechoslovakia: 2/2/11/13/3
  • UK: 2/2/8/10/1
  • Japan: 1/1/10/11/1
  • Hungary: 1/1/5/5
  • Senegal: 1/1/1/1

One-Time Directors

  • Richard Attenborough (gala)
  • Bill Duncalf
  • Judit Elek
  • Juraj Jakubisko
  • Paul Mazursky (gala)
  • Victor Sjöstrom (retrospective)
  • Susan Sontag

Feature Debuts

  • Richard Attenborough
  • Judit Elek
  • Paul Mazursky
  • Susan Sontag

Festivals

  • Cannes
    • Adalen 31 (Special Jury Prize)
    • My Night at Maud’s
    • Duet for Cannibals (Directors’ Fortnight)
    • Une femme douce (Directors’ Fortnight; also San Sebastian, Silver Seashell)
    • The Lady From Constantinople (Critics’ Week)
    • The Deserter and the Nomads (Out of Competition)
    • The Joke (?)
    • The Rite (?)
  • Berlin
    • Le Gai Savoir
  • Venice
    • Boy
    • Mandabi
  • N/A
    • Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
    • Destroy, She Said
    • The Epic That Never Was
    • Goto, Island of Love
    • HE Who Gets Slapped
    • Lions Love
    • The Merry Widow
    • Oh! What a Lovely War
    • One Fine Day
    • Pierre and Paul
    • Porcile
    • La Ronde

Oscar Nominees

  • Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice: Best Original Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Cinematography
  • My Night at Maud’s: Best Foreign Film, 1970 Best Original Screenplay
  • Adalen 31: Best Foreign Film

Events/Shorts

events
renoir events
shorts

Discussions By Length (Approximate)

  • 19:50 Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (22:57-42:47)
  • 14:57 My Night at Maud’s (2:12:44-2:27:41)
  • 14:35 Lions Love (1:45:41-2:00:16)
  • 13:35 Adalen 31 (1:22:03-1:35:38)
  • 12:20 Oh! What a Lovely War [One Person] (3:48:23-4:00:43)
  • 11:23 Boy (1:09:48-1:21:11)
  • 11:23 Destroy, She Said (2:48:05-2:59:18)
  • 11:13 La Ronde (2:01:30-2:12:43)
  • 10:59 Duet for Cannibals (2:37:05-2:48:04)
  • 10:24 Une femme douce (50:55-1:01:19)
  • 10:01 The Epic That Never Was (1:35:39-1:45:40)
  • 9:34 Mandabi (3:34:59-3:44:33)
  • 9:17 HE Who Gets Slapped (3:04:34-3:13:51)
  • 8:53 Le Gai Savoir (3:14:51-3:23:44)
  • 8:20 The Merry Widow (2:28:44-2:37:04)
  • 8:06 The Joke (42:48-50:54)
  • 7:17 The Rite (1:02:30-1:09:47)
  • 7:07 Porcile (3:27:51-3:34:58)
  • 5:14 Goto, Island of Love (2:59:19-3:04:33)
  • 4:05 The Deserter and the Nomads (3:23:45-3:27:50)
  • 3:48 One Fine Day (3:44:34-3:48:22)
  • 1:12 Pierre and Paul [Canceled] (2:00:17-2:01:29)
  • 1:09 The Lady From Constantinople [Canceled] (1:01:20-1:02:29)

Specifications

  • Paul Mazursky, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 105 minutes, 1.85:1, USA.
  • Jaromil Jires, Žert, 1969, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 80 minutes, 1.37:1, Czechoslovakia.
  • Robert Bresson, Une femme douce, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 88 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Judit Elek, Sziget a szárazföldön, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 79 minutes, 1.37:1, Hungary. (?)
  • Ingmar Bergman, Riten, 1969, 16 mm, black-and-white, sound, 72 minutes, 1.33:1, Sweden.
  • Nagisa Oshima, Shōnen, 1969, 35 mm, color and black-and-white, sound, 105 minutes, 2.35:1, Japan.
  • Bo Widerberg, Adalen 31, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 110 minutes, 2.35:1, Sweden.
  • Bill Duncalf, The Epic That Never Was, 1965, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 74 minutes, 1.37:1, UK.
  • Agnès Varda, Lions Love, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 110 minutes, 1.66:1, USA.
  • René Allio, Pierre et Paul, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 90 minutes, 1.66:1, France. (?)
  • Max Ophuls, La Ronde, 1950, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 93 minutes, 1.37:1, France.
  • Eric Rohmer, Ma nuit chez Maud, 1969, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 110 minutes, 1.37:1, France.
  • Erich von Stroheim, The Merry Widow, 1925, 35 mm, black-and-white, silent, 137 minutes, 1.33:1, USA.
  • Susan Sontag, Duett för kannibaler, 1969, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 105 minutes, 1.37:1, Sweden.
  • Marguerite Duras, Détruire, dit-elle, 1969, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 94 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Walerian Borowczyk, Goto, l’île d’amour, 1969, 16 mm, black-and-white and color, sound, 93 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Victor Sjöström, HE Who Gets Slapped, 1924, 35 mm, black-and-white, silent, 80 minutes, 1.37:1, USA.
  • Jean-Luc Godard, Le Gai Savoir, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 95 minutes, 1.37:1, France.
  • Juraj Jakubisko, Zbehovia a pútnici, 1968, 35 mm, color, sound, 103 minutes, 1.37:1, Czechoslovakia.
  • Pier Paolo Pasolini, Porcile, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 99 minutes, 1.85:1, Italy.
  • Ousmane Sembène, Mandabi, 1968, 35 mm, color, sound, 90 minutes, 1.85:1, Senegal.
  • Ermanno Olmi, Un certo giorno, 1968, 35 mm, color, sound, 102 minutes, 1.37:1, Italy.
  • Richard Attenborough, Oh! What a Lovely War, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 144 minutes, 2.35:1, UK.

2018 Festival Dispatch #1 Show Notes

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Subscribe to the podcast here.

Description
The first 2018 festival dispatch of the Catalyst and Witness podcast, devoted to exploring the films and format of the New York Film Festival, hosted by Ryan Swen and Dan Molloy. This covers the announcement of the 2018 main slate.

0:00-1:03:40 – Part One [The Favourite to Hotel by the River]
1:03:41-2:08:35 – Part Two [ROMA to At Eternity’s Gate]

Housekeeping

  • Hosted by Dan Molloy & Ryan Swen
  • Conceived and Edited by Ryan Swen
  • Recorded in Los Angeles and Portland on MacBook GarageBand, Edited in Audacity
  • Podcast photograph from Yi Yi, Logo designed by Dan Molloy
  • Recorded August 10, 2018
  • Released August 11, 2018
  • Music (in order of appearance):
    • Breathless
    • Still Life
    • Phoenix

2018 Reading Log

1. Stoner (1965, John Williams): 7/29-8/2
Difficult to accurately judge just how much this is colored by my absurd absence from reading for these past few years, but this is almost impossibly expansive and moving, covering such an expanse of time (almost cradle-to-grave) in both expanses and skips. Williams’s sense of conveying the almost compartmentalized nature of Stoner’s existence is so cannily divided into focusing on different characters and the events that transpire with them, and yet his approach can’t be reduced to as simple a statement as that. Characters are introduced and then reappear in a startling different context – Finch rather unexpectedly becomes perhaps the fifth most important character, Katharine is introduced in an almost curt manner – and throughout it is apparent that all involved in Stoner’s life are intertwined, perhaps in the most subconscious and buried ways. Stoner’s parents are (to the best of my recollection) not mentioned past the halfway point, and yet the indelible impression that their decaying, dirt-caked lives made on their son and the reader endures. And through it all, art is couched as both salvation and damnation, altering Stoner’s life (for better and worse) at every turn, defining his way of existence while ensuring its continued state of quiet desperation. Stoner is at once devastating and fulfilling, tracking the development and sustained intellect of a singular mindset, observing as it ebbs and flows according to the rhythms of a life that is at once ordinary and extraordinary. Nothing short of revelatory.

2. Tropic Moon (1933, Georges Simenon): 8/8-8/23
Perhaps the most destabilizing element of Tropic Moon is Simenon’s preference for plunging the reader in media res at the start of more or less every chapter, then doubling back to give some context (necessary or not). This happens with regularity, true, but it never fails to dole out a few jolts. Indeed, this tendency is emblematic of the whole book’s careful, more than a little horrifying approach, taking as a given its sweltering setting and organizing an examination of both milieu and intruder. What most stuns is that Timar’s (and Adèle’s, and Bouillox’s) character never truly changes past his first introduction; rather, he deepens and becomes more complex as the heat forces his character to evolve to the atmosphere – that is, until he can’t bear it anymore. He is no coaster; where others survive, he falls.