November 2018 Capsules

Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles
One of the most subtly yet immediately poignant moments in this masterwork comes midway through the film, when Jeanne is drinking coffee in a café. After she finishes and pays, she puts her elbow on the table and pauses, looking to her right with that placid yet fundamentally unreadable expression that she wears for nearly the entire film. It is the first — if not the last — time that the next step in her routine is not readily apparent to the audience, when she is given the chance to stop and ponder. Its brevity (it lasts less than twenty seconds) and its placement both within a larger shot and a larger sequence (she has just bought some yarn to continue knitting a sweater for her son) is emblematic of everything that this film accomplishes, everything that it evokes and embodies.

9th (1971): “This Year, Who Knows?” Show Notes

Table of Contents: Description, Corrections/Clarifications, Housekeeping, General, Main Slate, Ephemera, Recurring Directors, Recurring Countries, One-Time Directors, Debuts/Final Features, Festivals/Oscar Nominees, Shorts/Panels, Discussions By Length, Specifications

poster

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Description
The ninth episode of the Catalyst and Witness podcast, devoted to exploring the films and format of the New York Film Festival, hosted by Ryan Swen and Dan Molloy. This covers the ninth edition of the festival in 1971.

0:00-28:52 – Opening
28:53-1:27:08 – Part One [The Debut to Dodes’ka-den]
1:27:09-2:10:52 – Part Two [Directed by John Ford to The Sorrow and the Pity]
2:10:53-3:19:36 – Part Three [Punishment Park to Murmur of the Heart]
3:19:37-3:25:01 – Closing

Corrections/Clarifications

  • N/A

Housekeeping

  • Hosted by Dan Molloy & Ryan Swen
  • Conceived and Edited by Ryan Swen
  • Recorded in Los Angeles on Zoom H4N and Sennheiser Microphones, Edited in Audacity
  • Podcast photograph from Yi Yi, Logo designed by Dan Molloy
  • Poster by Frank Stella
  • Recorded October 29, 2018
  • Released October 31, 2018
  • Music (in order of appearance):
    • The Debut (opening night)
    • The Sorrow and the Pity (another favorite)
    • The Last Picture Show (favorite of the first section)
    • Four Nights of a Dreamer (favorite of the second section)
    • Punishment Park (favorite of the third section)
    • Murmur of the Heart (closing night)

General

  • Selection Committee: Richard Roud (program director), Richard Corliss, Arthur Knight, Arthur L. Mayer, Andrew Sarris, Susan Sontag, Henri Langlois (retrospective consultant)
  • Location: Vivian Beaumont Theater
  • Prices: 1-4 for zones 1-4; 2 for zone 1, 3 for zone 2, 7.50 for zone 3, 10 for zone 4 for opening night
  • Films seen for the podcast:
    • Ryan
      • Seen before podcast watching period: The Last Picture Show
      • Seen for the podcast: All available; none rewatched
      • Favorite films: Punishment Park, Four Nights of a Dreamer, The Sorrow and the Pity, The Last Picture Show, Pioneers in Ingolstadt
      • Least favorite films: Born to Win
      • Rewatch Round-Up: Zorns Lemma (8th)
    • Dan
      • Seen before podcast watching period: The Last Picture Show, Directed by John Ford, Four Nights of a Dreamer, Murmur of the Heart
      • Seen for the podcast: All available except The Sorrow and the Pity; none rewatched
      • Favorite films: The Last Picture Show, Punishment Park, Pioneers in Ingolstadt, The Decameron
      • Least favorite films: Born to Win, W.R.: Mysteries of the Organism, Fata Morgana
  • Discoveries of the festival: Punishment Park, A Safe Place
  • Unavailable films: In the Summertime, Bonaparte and the Revolution

Main Slate

Opening Night: The Debut [Nachalo] (1970, Gleb Panfilov)
October 1, 8:30
Released 1971
Family Life [Życie rodzinne] (1971, Krzysztof Zanussi)
October 2, 6:30
Never released
The Last Picture Show (1971, Peter Bogdanovich)
October 2, 9:30
Released 1971
In the Summertime [Durante l’estate] (1971, Ermanno Olmi)
October 3, 7:30
Never released
The Decameron [Il Decameron] (1971, Pier Paolo Pasolini)
October 4, 7:30
Released 1971
Dodes’ka-den [Dodesukaden] (1970, Akira Kurosawa)
October 5, 7:30
Released 1974
Directed by John Ford (1971, Peter Bogdanovich)
October 6, 8:30
Never released
Fata Morgana (1971, Werner Herzog)
October 7, 7:30
Never released
Four Nights of a Dreamer [Quatre nuits d’un rêveur] (1971, Robert Bresson)
October 8, 7:30
Released 1972
Pioneers in Ingolstadt [Pioniere in Ingolstadt] (1971, Rainer Werner Fassbinder)
October 9, 6:30
Never released
Born to Win (1971, Ivan Passer)
October 9, 9:30
Released 1971
The Sorrow and the Pity [Le Chagrin et la Pitié] (1969, Marcel Ophuls)
October 10, 6:00
Released 1972
Punishment Park (1971, Peter Watkins)
October 11, 7:30
Released 1971
In the Name of the Father [Nel nome del padre] (1971, Marco Bellocchio)
October 12, 7:30
Released 1974
W.R.: Mysteries of the Organism [W.R. – Misterije organizma] (1971, Dusan Makavejev)
October 13, 7:30
Released 1971
Bonaparte and the Revolution [Bonaparte et la Révolution] (1971, Abel Gance)
October 14, 6:00
Never released
A Safe Place (1971, Henry Jaglom)
October 15, 7:30
Released 1971
“Closing Night:” Murmur of the Heart [Le souffle au cœur] (1971, Louis Malle)
October 16, 9:30
Released 1971

Ephemera

  • Panel discussions to widen the scope of the festival by going beyond the individual films to broader issues after In the Summertime, Dodes’ka-den, Fata Morgana, Four Nights of a Dreamer, Punishment Park, W.R.: Mysteries of the Organism, A Safe Place

Recurring Directors
Key: films in this iteration excluding shorts/omnibus/retrospectives, films in this iteration including, films in the festival up to this point excluding, films up to this point including, number of gala spots (when applicable), number of festivals with more than one film shown (when applicable); † indicates their last appearance, fraction in parentheses indicates number of features shown from oeuvre, features released in the eligible timeframe, features in oeuvre

  • Peter Bogdanovich: 2/2/2/2/0/1†(2/20/20)
  • Robert Bresson: 1/1/5/5
  • Ermanno Olmi: 1/1/4/4
  • Pier Paolo Pasolini: 1/1/3/5/0/1
  • Werner Herzog: 1/1/3/3
  • Abel Gance: 1/1/2/3†(2/2/40)
  • Akira Kurosawa: 1/1/2/2/1
  • Marco Bellocchio: 1/1/2/2
  • Dusan Makavejev: 1/1/2/2†(2/11/11)
  • Ivan Passer: 1/1/2/2†(2/11/11)
  • Peter Watkins: 1/1/2/2†(2/12/12)
  • Louis Malle: 1/1/1/1/1
  • Gleb Panfilov: 1/1/1/1/1
  • Rainer Werner Fassbinder: 1/1/1/1
  • Marcel Ophuls: 1/1/1/1
  • Krzysztof Zanussi: 1/1/1/1

Recurring Countries
Key: films in this iteration excluding shorts/retrospectives, films in this iteration including, films in the festival up to this point excluding, films up to this point including, number of gala spots (when applicable)

  • USA: 5/5/24/35/1
  • France: 4/4/54/65/6
  • Italy: 3/3/24/28/1
  • West Germany: 2/2/9/9
  • Japan: 1/1/11/13/1
  • Poland: 1/1/7/7
  • Yugoslavia: 1/1/5/5
  • USSR: 1/1/4/4/2

One-Time Directors

  • Henry Jaglom

Feature Debuts

  • Henry Jaglom

Final Features

  • Abel Gance

Festivals

  • NYFF World Premiere
    • The Last Picture Show
    • Born to Win
    • In the Name of the Father
    • A Safe Place
  • Cannes
    • Family Life
    • Fata Morgana (Directors’ Fortnight)
    • Murmur of the Heart
    • W.R.: Mysteries of the Organism (Directors’ Fortnight)
    • Pioneers in Ingolstadt (?)
  • Berlin
    • The Decameron (Silver Bear Extraordinary Jury Prize)
    • Four Nights of a Dreamer
  • Venice
    • Directed by John Ford
    • In the Summertime
  • Other
    • Punishment Park (Atlanta and Edinburgh)
    • The Sorrow and the Pity (Dinard, Grand Prize)
  • N/A
    • Bonaparte and the Revolution
    • The Debut
    • Dodes’ka-den

Oscar Nominees

  • The Last Picture Show: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor (winner and second nominee), Best Supporting Actress (winner and second nominee), Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Cinematography
  • The Sorrow and the Pity: Best Documentary
  • Dodes’ka-den: Best Foreign Film
  • Murmur of the Heart: 1972 Best Original Screenplay

Shorts/Panels

shorts

Discussions By Length (Approximate)

  • 16:49 The Last Picture Show (46:28-1:03:17)
  • 15:24 Punishment Park (2:23:36-2:39:00)
  • 11:56 Dodes’ka-den (1:15:12-1:27:08)
  • 11:48 Directed by John Ford (1:28:08-1:39:56)
  • 11:45 The Sorrow and the Pity [One Person] (2:11:50-2:23:35)
  • 10:28 The Decameron (1:04:43-1:15:11)
  • 9:51 W.R.: Mysteries of the Organism (2:46:30-2:56:21)
  • 8:59 Family Life (37:28-46:27)
  • 8:49 Four Nights of a Dreamer (1:47:52-1:56:41)
  • 8:46 Murmur of the Heart (3:10:50-3:19:36)
  • 7:54 Fata Morgana (1:39:57-1:47:51)
  • 7:37 The Debut (29:50-37:27)
  • 7:31 A Safe Place (3:03:18-3:10:49)
  • 7:28 In the Name of the Father (2:39:01-2:46:29)
  • 7:10 Born to Win (2:03:42-2:10:52)
  • 6:59 Pioneers in Ingolstadt (1:56:42-2:03:41)
  • 6:55 Bonaparte and the Revolution [Unavailable] (2:56:22-3:03:17)
  • 1:24 In the Summertime [Unavailable] (1:03:18-1:04:42)

Specifications

  • Gleb Panfilov, Nachalo, 1970, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 91 minutes, 2.35:1, USSR.
  • Krzysztof Zanussi, Życie rodzinne, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 88 minutes, 1.66:1, Poland.
  • Peter Bogdanovich, The Last Picture Show, 1971, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 126 minutes, 1.85:1, USA.
  • Ermanno Olmi, Durante l’estate, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 105 minutes, 1.37:1, Italy.
  • Pier Paolo Pasolini, Il Decameron, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 111 minutes, 1.85:1, Italy.
  • Akira Kurosawa, Dodesukaden, 1970, 35 mm, color, sound, 140 minutes, 1.37:1, Japan.
  • Peter Bogdanovich, Directed by John Ford, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 99 minutes, 1.37:1, USA.
  • Werner Herzog, Fata Morgana, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 79 minutes, 1.37:1, West Germany.
  • Robert Bresson, Quatre nuits d’un rêveur, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 87 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Pioniere in Ingolstadt, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 84 minutes, 1.37:1, West Germany.
  • Ivan Passer, Born to Win, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 88 minutes, 1.85:1, USA.
  • Marcel Ophuls, Le Chagrin et la Pitié, 1969, 16 mm, black-and-white, sound, 251 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Peter Watkins, Punishment Park, 1971, 16 mm, color, sound, 91 minutes, 1.33:1, USA.
  • Marco Bellocchio, Nel nome del padre, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 115 minutes, 1.85:1, Italy.
  • Dusan Makavejev, W.R. – Misterije organizma, 1971, 16 mm and 35 mm, color and black-and-white, sound, 84 minutes, 1.37:1, Yugoslavia.
  • Abel Gance, Bonaparte et la Révolution, 1971, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 275 minutes, 1.37:1, France.
  • Henry Jaglom, A Safe Place, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 94 minutes, 1.85:1, USA.
  • Louis Malle, Le souffle au cœur, 1971, 35 mm, color, sound, 118 minutes, 1.66:1, France.

2018 Festival Dispatch #3 Show Notes

Listen to the podcast here.
Subscribe to the podcast here.

Description
The third 2018 festival dispatch of the Catalyst and Witness podcast, devoted to exploring the films and format of the New York Film Festival, hosted by Ryan Swen and Dan Molloy. This covers the second half of the 2018 New York Film Festival, and features guests Forrest Cardamenis, Courtney Duckworth, Caden Mark Gardner, Jeva Lange, Jason Miller, and Kyle Pletcher.

0:00-58:56 – Part One
58:57-1:48:21 – Part Two

Housekeeping

  • Hosted by Dan Molloy & Ryan Swen
  • Conceived and Edited by Ryan Swen
  • Guests: Forrest Cardamenis, Courtney Duckworth, Caden Mark Gardner, Jeva Lange, Jason Miller, Kyle Pletcher
  • Recorded in Los Angeles, New York City, Schenectady, and Trenton on Zoom H4N and Sennheiser Microphones and MacBook GarageBand and Audacity, Edited in Audacity
  • Podcast photograph from Yi Yi, Logo designed by Dan Molloy
  • Recorded October 13, 2018
  • Released October 27, 2018
  • Music (in order of appearance):
    • Historias extraordinarias
    • Kaili Blues
    • Happy Hour

New York Film Festival Running Tallies

Festivals by Number of Films/Programs/New Features:

  • 4th (1966): 31/25/22
  • 2nd (1964): 30/26/28
  • 8th (1970): 28/26/27
  • 3rd (1965): 28/25/18
  • 6th (1968): 26/25/22
  • 5th (1967): 26/23/22
  • 7th (1969): 23/23/20
  • 1st (1963): 21/21/21
  • 9th (1971): 18/18/18

Total: 231/212/198

Festivals by Total Running Time/Average Running Time per Film:

  • 3rd (1965): 2815/100:32
  • 2nd (1964): 2759/91:58
  • 5th (1967): 2575/99:02
  • 8th (1970): 2520/90:00
  • 4th (1966): 2515/81:08
  • 6th (1968): 2450/94:14
  • 7th (1969): 2258/98:10
  • 9th (1971): 2126/118:07
  • 1st (1963): 2079/99:00

Total: 22097/95:39

Festivals by Primary Location:

  • Philharmonic Hall: 8
  • Alice Tully Hall: 1
  • Vivian Beaumont Theater: 1

Selection Committee Members:

  • Richard Roud (program director): 9
  • Amos Vogel (festival director): 6
  • Arthur Knight: 6
  • Andrew Sarris: 6
  • Susan Sontag: 5
  • Henri Langlois (retrospective consultant): 3
  • Richard Corliss: 1
  • Penelope Huston: 1
  • Arthur L. Mayer: 1

Directors:
Key: films in the festival up to this point excluding shorts/omnibus/retrospectives, films up to this point including, number of gala spots (when applicable), number of festivals with more than one film shown (when applicable); † indicates filmmakers with no more films

  • Jean-Luc Godard: 12/16/2/5
  • Luis Buñuel: 5/5/1/2
  • Robert Bresson: 5/5
  • Bernardo Bertolucci: 4/5/0/1
  • Alain Resnais: 4/4/2
  • Jerzy Skolimowski: 4/4/0/2
  • Ermanno Olmi: 4/4
  • Pier Paolo Pasolini: 3/5/0/1
  • Milos Forman: 3/3/2
  • Chris Marker: 3/3/1
  • Satyajit Ray: 3/3/1
  • Agnès Varda: 3/3/1
  • René Allio: 3/3†
  • Werner Herzog: 3/3
  • Jean-Marie Straub & Danièle Huillet: 3/3
  • Bo Widerberg: 3/3
  • Kon Ichikawa: 2/3/0/1
  • Peter Whitehead: 2/3/0/1†
  • Abel Gance: 2/3†
  • Peter Bogdanovich: 2/2/0/1†
  • Francesco Rosi: 2/2/0/1
  • Akira Kurosawa: 2/2/1
  • Marco Bellocchio: 2/2
  • Claude Chabrol: 2/2
  • Marguerite Duras: 2/2
  • Kjell Grede: 2/2†
  • Miklós Jancsó: 2/2
  • Alexander Kluge: 2/2
  • Masaki Kobayashi: 2/2†
  • Joseph Losey: 2/2
  • Dusan Makavejev: 2/2†
  • Ivan Passer: 2/2†
  • Carlos Saura: 2/2
  • Leopoldo Torre Nilsson: 2/2†
  • Peter Watkins: 2/2†
  • Jan Nemec: 1/3/0/1†
  • Joris Ivens: 1/2/1
  • Jiri Menzel: 1/2/1†
  • Gianni Amico: 1/2
  • Jaromil Jires: 1/2†
  • Kenji Mizoguchi: 1/2†
  • Eric Rohmer: 1/2
  • Roberto Rossellini: 1/2
  • Jean Rouch: 1/2†
  • Grigori Kozintsev: 1/1/1
  • Louis Malle: 1/1/1
  • Gleb Panfilov: 1/1/1
  • François Truffaut: 1/1/1
  • Ingmar Bergman: 1/1
  • Walerian Borowczyk: 1/1
  • John Cassavetes: 1/1
  • Carlos Diegues: 1/1
  • Rainer Werner Fassbinder: 1/1
  • Jean-Pierre Gorin: 1/1
  • James Ivory: 1/1
  • Ken Loach: 1/1
  • Sidney Lumet: 1/1
  • Adolfas Mekas: 1/1
  • Jonas Mekas: 1/1
  • Jean-Pierre Melville: 1/1
  • Marcel Ophuls: 1/1
  • Nagisa Oshima: 1/1
  • Sergei Paradjanov: 1/1
  • Aleksandar Petrovi: 1/1
  • Maurice Pialat: 1/1
  • Roman Polanski: 1/1
  • Bob Rafelson: 1/1
  • Jacques Rivette: 1/1
  • Glauber Rocha: 1/1
  • Michael Roemer: 1/1
  • Volker Schlöndorff: 1/1
  • Martin Scorsese: 1/1
  • Ousmane Sembène: 1/1
  • István Szabó: 1/1
  • Luchino Visconti: 1/1
  • Andrzej Wajda: 1/1
  • Orson Welles: 1/1
  • Krzysztof Zanussi: 1/1
  • Max Ophuls: 0/2
  • Jean Renoir: 0/2
  • Erich von Stroheim: 0/2
  • Michelangelo Antonioni: 0/1
  • Vera Chytilová: 0/1
  • Cecil B. DeMille: 0/1
  • Louis Feuillade: 0/1
  • Rouben Mamoulian: 0/1
  • Albert & David Maysles: 0/1

Directors with only one appearance: 72

Countries:
Key: films in the festival up to this point excluding shorts/omnibus/retrospectives, films up to this point including, number of gala spots (when applicable)

  • France: 54/65/6
  • USA: 24/35/1
  • Italy: 24/28/1
  • Czechoslovakia: 11/13/3
  • Japan: 11/13/1
  • UK: 11/13/1
  • Sweden: 10/10
  • West Germany: 9/9
  • Poland: 7/7
  • Hungary: 5/5
  • Yugoslavia: 5/5
  • USSR: 4/4/2
  • Canada: 3/4
  • India: 3/3/1
  • Spain: 3/3/1
  • Argentina: 3/3
  • Mexico: 2/2/1
  • Belgium: 2/2
  • Brazil: 2/2
  • Denmark: 2/2
  • Greece: 2/2
  • Senegal: 1/1

Film Format:

  • 35mm: 196
  • 16mm: 33
  • 16mm and 35mm: 2

Aspect Ratio:

  • 1.37:1: 82
  • 1.66:1: 53
  • 1.33:1: 35
  • 1.85:1: 31
  • 2.35:1: 24
  • 1.20:1: 4
  • 2.55:1: 1
  • 1.33:1 and 4.00:1: 1

B&W/Color:

  • Black & White: 141
  • Color: 76
  • Black & White and Color: 9
  • Color and Black & White: 5

Sound/Silent:

  • Sound: 220
  • Silent: 10
  • Silent/Sound: 1

Films Over Two-and-a-Quarter Hours

  • Les Vampires (3rd, 417)
  • Napoléon (5th, 333)
  • Bonaparte and the Revolution (9th, 275)
  • The Sorrow and the Pity (9th, 251)
  • L’Argent (6th, 195)
  • Red Beard (3rd, 185)
  • Woman in the Dunes (2nd, 147)
  • Cyrano and d’Artagnan (2nd, 145)
  • Le Joli Mai (1st, 145)
  • Oh! What a Lovely War (7th, 144)
  • Dodes’ka-den (9th, 140)
  • Hamlet (2nd, 140)
  • The Nun (6th, 140)
  • The Merry Widow (7th, 137)
  • The Big City (2nd, 136)

Number of documentaries (feature or short): 23
Films directed in part or whole by women: 13
Films released the same year as their festival appearance: 50
Films never released: 66

2018 Festival Dispatch #2 Show Notes

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Subscribe to the podcast here.

Description
The second 2018 festival dispatch of the Catalyst and Witness podcast, devoted to exploring the films and format of the New York Film Festival, hosted by Ryan Swen and Dan Molloy. This covers the first half of the 2018 New York Film Festival, and features guests Aret Frost, David Neary, and Kyle Pletcher.

0:00-52:36 – Part One
52:37-1:41:27 – Part Two

Housekeeping

  • Hosted by Dan Molloy & Ryan Swen
  • Conceived and Edited by Ryan Swen
  • Guests: Aret Frost, David Neary, Kyle Pletcher
  • Recorded in Los Angeles, New York City, and Trenton on Zoom H4N and Sennheiser Microphones and MacBook GarageBand and Audacity, Edited in Audacity
  • Podcast photograph from Yi Yi, Logo designed by Dan Molloy
  • Recorded October 6, 2018
  • Released October 9, 2018
  • Music (in order of appearance):
    • The Hole
    • The Day He Arrives
    • Trouble Every Day

October 2018 Capsules

A Star Is Born
Yes, “The Man That Got Away” might be the greatest musical number ever committed to film, but one sequence seems to capture the spirit of this extravagant, devastating masterpiece even better: “Born in a Trunk.” (Complicating this of course is the fact that “Born in a Trunk” was filmed after Cukor had finished his involvement with the film, though this only strengthens its connections to the machinations of Hollywood.) The medley of songs from numerous genres indulges in all the abstraction and expressionism possible in the American film industry, lunging through vividly contrasting set after set, with the only connective tissue being Garland’s voice and physicality. It is blatantly, gloriously unclear whether this is some part of Vicki Lester’s star-making role or a mental projection of her thinking on her past life through said role – notably, the Academy ratio of the film-within-the-film expands to CinemaScope in the span of a cut. Comparisons to Gene Kelly’s repeated intonations of “dignity, always dignity” or even “Broadway Melody” from Singin’ in the Rain are there, of course, but the lines between role, performer-in-a-role, and performer are even further blurred. And throughout, it is so clear that Vicki Lester is the real deal, that she must shine and diminish all around her. This is the film in less than 15 minutes; what makes it what is is the two and a half hours left: not one second is anything less than vital.

8th (1970): “The Deluge” Show Notes

Table of Contents: Description, Corrections/Clarifications, Housekeeping, General, Main Slate, Ephemera, Recurring Directors, Recurring Countries, One-Time Directors, Debuts, Festivals/Oscar Nominees, Events/Shorts, Discussions By Length, Specifications

poster

Listen to the podcast here.
Subscribe to the podcast here.

Description
The eighth episode of the Catalyst and Witness podcast, devoted to exploring the films and format of the New York Film Festival, hosted by Ryan Swen and Dan Molloy. This covers the eighth edition of the festival in 1970.

0:00-17:13 – Opening
17:14-1:19:40 – Part One [The Wild Child to Othon]
1:19:41-2:19:33 – Part Two [Le Boucher to Je t’aime, je t’aime]
2:19:34-2:53:46 – Part Three [The Inheritors to The Garden of Delights]
2:53:47-3:56:36 – Part Four [The Conformist to Tristana]
3:56:37-4:04:55 – Closing

Corrections/Clarifications

  • N/A

Housekeeping

  • Hosted by Dan Molloy & Ryan Swen
  • Conceived and Edited by Ryan Swen
  • Recorded in Los Angeles on Zoom H4N and Sennheiser Microphones, Edited in Audacity
  • Podcast photograph from Yi Yi, Logo designed by Dan Molloy
  • Poster by James Rosenquist
  • Recorded September 24, 2018
  • Released September 30, 2018
  • Music (in order of appearance):
    • The Wild Child (opening night)
    • Le Boucher (another favorite)
    • Othon (favorite of the first section)
    • Je t’aime, je t’aime (favorite of the second section)
    • La Musica (favorite of the third section)
    • The Conformist (favorite of the fourth section)
    • Tristana (closing night)

General

  • Selection Committee: Richard Roud (program director), Arthur Knight, Andrew Sarris, Susan Sontag, Henri Langlois (retrospective consultant)
  • Location: Philharmonic Hall and Alice Tully Hall
  • Prices: 2.50 for terraces, 3.50 for orchestra, 4.50 for loge; ATH 2.50 and 3.50 for orchestra, 4.50 for loge; add 1.50 for opening night
  • Films seen for the podcast:
    • Ryan
      • Seen before podcast watching period: Five Easy Pieces
      • Seen for the podcast: All available; Five Easy Pieces rewatched
      • Favorite films: Othon, Je t’aime, je t’aime, Zorns Lemma, Le Boucher, The Crucified Lovers, The Conformist, Days and Nights in the Forest, The Wild Child
      • Least favorite films: Harry Munter, Comrades
      • Catch-Up Corner: One Fine Day (7th)
      • Seen after the podcast: Zorns Lemma rewatched (9th)
    • Dan
      • Seen before podcast watching period: The Wild Child, Five Easy Pieces, Le Boucher, The Crucified Lovers, The Conformist, Tristana
      • Seen for the podcast: All available except Une simple histoire, Even Dwarfs Started Small, The Spider’s Stratagem, The Cannibals; The Wild Child, Five Easy Pieces rewatched
      • Favorite films: Je t’aime, je t’aime, Othon, Wind From the East, Zorns Lemma, Days and Nights in the Forest
      • Least favorite films: Harry Munter, Comrades, The Scavengers
  • Discoveries of the festival: Days and Nights in the Forest, Wind From the East, Le Boucher
  • Unavailable films: Double Pisces, Scorpio Rising; Mistreatment; Street Scenes 1970; The Inheritors; From Lumiere to Langlois: The French Silent Cinema; Langlois; Praise Marx and Pass the Ammunition

Main Slate

Opening Night: The Wild Child [L’Enfant sauvage] (1970, François Truffaut)
September 10, 9:00
Released 1970
Wind From the East [Le Vent d’est] (1970, Groupe Dziga Vertov and Jean-Luc Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin)
September 11, 6:30 {Alice Tully Hall}
Never released
Five Easy Pieces (1970, Bob Rafelson)
September 11, 9:30
Released 1970
Zorns Lemma (1970, Hollis Frampton)
And: Double Pisces, Scorpio Rising (1970, Dick Fontaine)
September 12, 4:00
Never released/Never released
Othon [Les Yeux ne veulent pas en tout temps se fermer, ou Peut-être qu’un jour Rome se permettra de choisir à son tour] (1970, Jean-Marie Straub & Danièle Huillet)
September 12, 6:30 {Alice Tully Hall}
Released 1971
Le Boucher [The Butcher] (1970, Claude Chabrol)
September 12, 9:30
Released 1971
Comrades [Camarades] (1970, Marin Karmitz)
September 13, 1:30
Never released
Retrospective: The Crucified Lovers [Chikamatsu Monogatari] (1954, Kenji Mizoguchi)
September 13, 4:00 {Alice Tully Hall}
Released 1971
Mistreatment [Misshandlingen] (1969, Lars Lennart Forsberg)
September 13, 6:30 {Alice Tully Hall}
Never released
Kes (1969, Ken Loach)
September 13, 9:30
Released 1970
Street Scenes 1970 (1970, Martin Scorsese)
September 14, 6:30
Never released
Je t’aime, je t’aime [I Love You, I Love You] (1968, Alain Resnais)
September 14, 9:30
Released 1972
The Inheritors [Os Herdeiros] (1970, Carlos Diegues)
September 15, 6:30
Never released
La Musica [The Music] (1967, Marguerite Duras & Paul Seban)
September 15, 9:30
Never released
Une simple histoire [A Simple Story] (1959, Marcel Hanoun)
September 16, 6:30
Never released
Even Dwarfs Started Small [Auch Zwerge haben klein angefangen] (1970, Werner Herzog)
September 16, 9:30
Released 1971
The Spider’s Stratagem [Strategia del ragno] (1970, Bernardo Bertolucci)
September 17, 6:30
Released 1973
Harry Munter (1969, Kjell Grede)
September 17, 9:30
Never released
The Garden of Delights [El jardín de las delicias] (1970, Carlos Saura)
September 18, 6:30
Released 1971
The Conformist [Il conformista] (1970, Bernardo Bertolucci)
September 18, 9:30
Released 1971
From Lumiere to Langlois: The French Silent Cinema (1970, Henri Langlois)
Also: Langlois (1970, Elia Hershon & Roberto Guerra)
September 19, 2:00
Never released/Never released
Days and Nights in the Forest [Aranyēra Dinarātri] (1970, Satyajit Ray)
September 19, 6:30
Released 1973
The Cannibals [I cannibali] (1970, Liliana Cavani)
September 19, 9:30
Never released
Praise Marx and Pass the Ammunition (1970, Maurice Hatton)
September 20, 4:00
Never released
The Scavengers [I recuperanti] (1970, Ermanno Olmi)
September 20, 6:30
Never released
“Closing Night”: Tristana (1970, Luis Buñuel)
September 20, 9:30
Released 1970

Ephemera

  • “American Voices”: 12 programs of films by and about minority groups in the America of today, shown at the Library and Museum of Performing Arts in Lincoln Center, all free
  • “Cinema and Color: 12 programs of films, shown at the Library and Museum of Performing Arts in Lincoln Center, all free
  • 1927-1933: Medium Rare”: 10 programs of films, shown at Alice Tully Hall, all 2.25

Recurring Directors
Key: films in this iteration excluding shorts/omnibus/retrospectives, films in this iteration including, films in the festival up to this point excluding, films up to this point including, number of gala spots (when applicable), number of festivals with more than one film shown (when applicable); † indicates their last appearance, fraction in parentheses indicates number of features shown from oeuvre, features released in the eligible timeframe, features in oeuvre

  • Bernardo Bertolucci: 2/2/4/5/0/1
  • Jean-Luc Godard: 1/1/12/16/2/5
  • Luis Buñuel: 1/1/5/5/1/2
  • Alain Resnais: 1/1/4/4/2
  • Satyajit Ray: 1/1/3/3/1
  • Jean-Marie Straub & Danièle Huillet: 1/1/3/3
  • Claude Chabrol: 1/1/2/2
  • Marguerite Duras: 1/1/2/2
  • Werner Herzog: 1/1/2/2
  • Ermanno Olmi: 1/1/3/3
  • Carlos Saura: 1/1/2/2
  • François Truffaut: 1/1/1/1/1
  • Carlos Diegues: 1/1/1/1
  • Jean-Pierre Gorin: 1/1/1/1
  • Kjell Grede: 1/1/2/2†(2/8/8)
  • Ken Loach: 1/1/1/1
  • Bob Rafelson: 1/1/1/1
  • Martin Scorsese: 1/1/1/1
  • Kenji Mizoguchi: 0/1/1/2†(2/0/93)

Recurring Countries
Key: films in this iteration excluding shorts/retrospectives, films in this iteration including, films in the festival up to this point excluding, films up to this point including, number of gala spots (when applicable)

  • France: 9/9/50/61/5
  • Italy: 5/5/21/25/1
  • USA: 3/3/19/30/1
  • UK: 3/3/11/13/1
  • Sweden: 2/2/10/10
  • Spain: 2/2/3/3/1
  • West Germany: 1/1/7/7
  • India: 1/1/3/3/1
  • Brazil: 1/1/2/2
  • Japan: 0/1/10/12/1

One-Time Directors

  • Liliana Cavani
  • Dick Fontaine
  • Lars Lennart Forsberg
  • Hollis Frampton
  • Groupe Dziga Vertov
  • Marcel Hanoun
  • Maurice Hatton
  • Elia Hershon & Roberto Guerra
  • Marin Karmitz
  • Henri Langlois
  • Paul Seban

Feature Debuts

  • Marguerite Duras
  • Lars Lennart Forsberg
  • Hollis Frampton
  • Jean-Pierre Gorin
  • Marcel Hanoun
  • Maurice Hatton
  • Elia Hershon & Roberto Guerra
  • Henri Langlois
  • Paul Seban

Festivals

  • NYFF World Premiere
    • Five Easy Pieces
    • Street Scenes 1970
    • Zorns Lemma
  • Cannes
    • Je t’aime, je t’aime (1968; also San Sebastian)
    • Harry Munter
    • Comrades (Critics’ Week)
    • Kes (Critics’ Week; also Karlov Vary, Crystal Globe)
    • Mistreatment (Critics’ Week)
    • The Cannibals (Directors’ Fortnight)
    • Even Dwarfs Started Small (Directors’ Fortnight)
    • The Inheritors (Directors’ Fortnight)
    • Othon (Directors’ Fortnight)
    • Wind From the East (Directors’ Fortnight)
    • Tristana (Out of Competition)
  • Berlin
    • The Conformist
    • Days and Nights in the Forest
    • The Wild Child (?)
  • Other
    • Le Boucher (San Sebastian, Best Actress)
  • N/A
    • The Crucified Lovers
    • Double Pisces, Scorpio Rising
    • From Lumiere to Langlois: The French Silent Cinema
    • The Garden of Delights
    • Langlois
    • La Musica
    • Praise Marx and Pass the Ammunition
    • The Scavengers
    • Une simple histoire
    • The Spider’s Stratagem

Oscar Nominees

  • Five Easy Pieces: Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Original Screenplay
  • The Conformist: Best Adapted Screenplay
  • Tristana: Best Foreign Film

Events/Shorts

events
shorts

Discussions By Length (Approximate)

  • 16:38 The Conformist (2:54:44-3:11:22)
  • 14:59 Days and Nights in the Forest (3:14:13-3:29:12)
  • 14:17 Othon (1:05:23-1:19:40)
  • 13:35 Je t’aime, je t’aime (2:05:58-2:19:33)
  • 13:05 The Wild Child (18:11-31:16)
  • 12:16 Le Boucher (1:20:41-1:32:57)
  • 11:16 Wind From the East (31:17-42:33)
  • 11:09 Zorns Lemma (53:06-1:04:15)
  • 11:08 The Crucified Lovers (1:39:59-1:51:07)
  • 10:48 Kes (1:52:32-2:03:20)
  • 10:31 Five Easy Pieces (42:34-53:05)
  • 9:24 Tristana (3:47:12-3:56:36)
  • 9:03 The Cannibals [One Person] (3:29:13-3:38:16)
  • 7:57 La Musica (2:21:40-2:29:37)
  • 7:00 Comrades (1:32:58-1:39:58)
  • 6:52 The Scavengers (3:40:19-3:47:11)
  • 5:58 Harry Munter (2:44:22-2:50:20)
  • 5:28 Even Dwarfs Started Small [One Person] (2:33:25-2:38:53)
  • 5:27 The Spider’s Stratagem [One Person] (2:38:54-2:44:21)
  • 3:46 Une simple histoire [One Person] (2:29:38-2:33:24)
  • 3:25 The Garden of Delights (2:50:21-2:53:46)
  • 2:49 From Lumiere to Langlois: The French Silent Cinema [Unavailable] and Langlois [Unavailable] (3:11:23-3:14:12)
  • 2:36 Street Scenes 1970 [Unavailable] (2:03:21-2:05:57)
  • 2:01 Praise Marx and Pass the Ammunition [Unavailable] (3:38:17-3:40:18)
  • 1:23 Mistreatment [Unavailable] (1:51:08-1:52:31)
  • 1:06 The Inheritors [Unavailable] (2:20:33-2:21:39)
  • 1:06 Double Pisces, Scorpio Rising [Unavailable] (1:04:16-1:05:22)

Specifications

  • François Truffaut, L’Enfant sauvage, 1970, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 83 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Groupe Dziga Vertov and Jean-Luc Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin, Le Vent d’est, 1970, 16 mm, color, sound, 95 minutes, 1.33:1, France.
  • Bob Rafelson, Five Easy Pieces, 1970, 35 mm, color, sound, 98 minutes, 1.85:1, USA.
  • Hollis Frampton, Zorns Lemma, 1970, 16 mm, color, sound, 60 minutes, 1.33:1, USA.
  • Dick Fontaine, Double Pisces, Scorpio Rising, 1970, 16 mm, color, sound, 58 minutes, 1.33:1, UK.
  • Jean-Marie Straub & Danièle Huillet, Les Yeux ne veulent pas en tout temps se fermer, ou Peut-être qu’un jour Rome se permettra de choisir à son tour, 1970, 16 mm, color, sound, 88 minutes, 1.33:1, Italy.
  • Claude Chabrol, Le Boucher, 1970, 35 mm, color, sound, 93 minutes, 1.85:1, France.
  • Marin Karmitz, Camarades, 1970, 16 mm, color, sound, 85 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Kenji Mizoguchi, Chikamatsu Monogatari, 1954, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 102 minutes, 1.37:1, Japan.
  • Lars Lennart Forsberg, Misshandlingen, 1969, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 104 minutes, 1.37:1, Sweden. (?)
  • Ken Loach, Kes, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 111 minutes, 1.66:1, UK.
  • Martin Scorsese, Street Scenes 1970, 1970, 16 mm, black-and-white, sound, 75 minutes, 1.33:1, USA. (?)
  • Alain Resnais, Je t’aime, je t’aime, 1968, 35 mm, color, sound, 94 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Carlos Diegues, Os Herdeiros, 1970, 35 mm, color, sound, 110 minutes, 1.37:1, Brazil. (?)
  • Marguerite Duras & Paul Seban, La Musica, 1967, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 80 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Marcel Hanoun, Une simple histoire, 1959, 16 mm, black-and-white, sound, 68 minutes, 1.33:1, France.
  • Werner Herzog, Auch Zwerge haben klein angefangen, 1970, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 96 minutes, 1.37:1, West Germany.
  • Bernardo Bertolucci, Strategia del ragno, 1970, 35 mm, color, sound, 100 minutes, 1.37:1, Italy.
  • Kjell Grede, Harry Munter, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 101 minutes, 1.66:1, Sweden.
  • Carlos Saura, El jardín de las delicias, 1970, 35 mm, color, sound, 95 minutes, 1.85:1, Spain.
  • Bernardo Bertolucci, Il conformista, 1970, 35 mm, color, sound, 113 minutes, 1.66:1, Italy.
  • Henri Langlois, From Lumiere to Langlois: The French Silent Cinema, 1970, 35 mm, black-and-white, silent, 60 minutes, 1.33:1, France. (?)
  • Elia Hershon & Roberto Guerra, Langlois, 1970, 16 mm, color, sound, 52 minutes, 1.33:1, France. (?)
  • Satyajit Ray, Aranyēra Dinarātri, 1970, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 115 minutes, 1.37:1, India.
  • Liliana Cavani, I cannibali, 1970, 35 mm, color, sound, 88 minutes, 2.35:1, Italy.
  • Maurice Hatton, Praise Marx and Pass the Ammunition, 1970, 35 mm, color, sound, 90 minutes, 1.66:1, UK. (?)
  • Ermanno Olmi, I recuperanti, 1970, 35 mm, color, sound, 101 minutes, 1.37:1, Italy.
  • Luis Buñuel, Tristana, 1970, 35 mm, color, sound, 105 minutes, 1.66:1, Spain.

September 2018 Capsules

Hahaha
I can’t say if this technique is totally unprecedented in film, but Hong’s decision to render Hahaha‘s present-day scenes exclusively in black-and-white stills – à la the “previously ons” in Out 1, interestingly enough – and voiceover is at once a remarkably and counterintuitively lovely choice and so indicative of the general playfulness that marks his entire work. Though Moon-kyung says that he and Joong-sik stick to the pleasant parts of their scattered recollections, the film frequently goes down the thornier and more melancholic avenues that characterize Hong’s work, often within the same scene. In this light, and given the connotation that black-and-white and voiceover often have in more conventional films, the present almost function as the memories in this film, fragmented and constructed more out of sensations and glances than anything else. Though it will likely be the last time these friends meet for some time, it feels as if it is already passing into the recesses of their minds; what matters more is the small city of Tongyeong, and the people and places that inhabit it. A faintly ridiculous dream with a long gone admiral-hero, a piano piece, numerous scraps of poetry, the sensation of holding someone close: these are the good things in life.

7th (1969): “New Site, Same Scene” Show Notes

Table of Contents: Description, Corrections/Clarifications, Housekeeping, General, Main Slate, Ephemera, Recurring Directors, Recurring Countries, One-Time Directors, Debuts, Festivals/Oscar Nominees, Events/Shorts, Discussions By Length, Specifications

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Description
The seventh episode of the Catalyst and Witness podcast, devoted to exploring the films and format of the New York Film Festival, hosted by Ryan Swen and Dan Molloy. This covers the seventh edition of the festival in 1969, and features special guest Caden Mark Gardner, critic and co-publisher of Body Talk.

0:00-21:56 – Opening
21:57-1:21:11 – Part One [Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice to Boy]
1:21:12-2:27:41 – Part Two [Adalen 31 to My Night at Maud’s]
2:27:42-3:13:51 – Part Three [The Merry Widow to HE Who Gets Slapped]
3:13:52-4:00:43 – Part Four [Le Gai Savoir to Oh! What a Lovely War]
4:00:44-4:09:52 – Closing

Corrections/Clarifications

  • N/A

Housekeeping

  • Hosted by Dan Molloy & Ryan Swen
  • Special Guest Caden Mark Gardner
  • Conceived and Edited by Ryan Swen
  • Recorded in Los Angeles, Portland, and Schenectady on MacBook GarageBand, Edited in Audacity
  • Podcast photograph from Yi Yi, Logo designed by Dan Molloy
  • Poster by Marisol Escobar
  • Recorded August 28, 2018
  • Released August 31, 2018
  • Music (in order of appearance):
    • Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (opening night)
    • La Ronde (another favorite)
    • Boy (favorite of the first section)
    • My Night at Maud’s (favorite of the second section)
    • Destroy, She Said (favorite of the third section)
    • Mandabi (favorite of the fourth section)
    • Oh! What a Lovely War (closing night)

General

  • Selection Committee: Richard Roud (program director), Penelope Huston, Arthur Knight, Andrew Sarris, Susan Sontag, Henri Langlois (retrospective consultant)
  • Location: Alice Tully Hall
  • Prices: 2.25 and 3.50 for orchestra, 4.50 for loge
  • Films seen for the podcast:
    • Ryan
      • Seen before podcast watching period: Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, Le Gai Savoir
      • Seen for the podcast: All available except The Deserter and the Nomads and One Fine Day; Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice rewatched
      • Favorite films: My Night at Maud’s, Boy, La Ronde, Une femme douce, Destroy, She Said, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
      • Least favorite films: Goto, Island of Love
      • Seen after the podcast: One Fine Day (8th)
    • Dan
      • Seen before podcast watching period: Une femme douce, Boy, My Night at Maud’s
      • Seen for the podcast: All available except Oh! What a Lovely War; Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice and La Ronde rewatched
      • Favorite films: Boy, My Night at Maud’s, Destroy, She Said, La Ronde, Adalen 31
      • Least favorite films: Porcile, Goto, Island of Love, The Deserter and the Nomads
    • Caden
      • Seen before podcast watching period: Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, Une femme douce, Boy, La Ronde, My Night at Maud’s, Le Gai Savoir
      • Seen for the podcast: All available except Oh! What a Lovely War; My Night at Maud’s rewatched
      • Favorite films: Boy, Une femme douce, My Night at Maud’s, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
      • Least favorite films: The Deserter and the Nomads
  • Discoveries of the festival: Destroy, She Said, Adalen 31, Oh! What a Lovely War
  • Unavailable films: The Lady From Constantinople, Pierre and Paul

Main Slate

Opening Night: Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969, Paul Mazursky)
September 16, 6:30
Released 1969
The Joke [Žert] (1969, Jaromil Jires)
September 17, 6:30
Released 1970
Une femme douce [A Gentle Woman] (1969, Robert Bresson)
September 17, 9:30
Released 1971
The Lady From Constantinople [Sziget a szárazföldön] (1969, Judit Elek)
September 18, 6:30
Never released
The Rite [Riten] (1969, Ingmar Bergman)
September 18, 9:30
Never released
Boy [Shōnen] (1969, Nagisa Oshima)
September 19, 6:30
Released 1970
Adalen 31 (1969, Bo Widerberg)
September 19, 9:30
Released 1969
The Epic That Never Was (1965, Bill Duncalf)
September 20, 12:00 AM
Never released
Lions Love (1969, Agnès Varda)
September 20, 9:30
Released 1969
Pierre and Paul [Pierre et Paul] (1969, René Allio)
September 21, 1:00
Never released
Retrospective: La Ronde (1950, Max Ophuls)
September 21, 9:30
Released 1954
My Night at Maud’s [Ma nuit chez Maud] (1969, Eric Rohmer)
September 23, 9:30
Released 1970
Retrospective: The Merry Widow (1925, Erich von Stroheim)
September 24, 6:30
Released 1925
Duet for Cannibals [Duett för kannibaler] (1969, Susan Sontag)
September 24, 9:30
Released 1969
Destroy, She Said [Détruire, dit-elle] (1969, Marguerite Duras)
September 25, 9:30
Released 1970
Goto, Island of Love [Goto, l’île d’amour] (1969, Walerian Borowczyk)
September 26, 9:30
Never released
Retrospective: HE Who Gets Slapped (1924, Victor Sjöström)
September 27, 1:00
Released 1924
Le Gai Savoir [Joy of Learning] (1969, Jean-Luc Godard)
September 27, 6:30
Released 1970
The Deserter and the Nomads [Zbehovia a pútnici] (1968, Juraj Jakubisko)
September 27, 9:30
Never released
Porcile [Pigsty] (1969, Pier Paolo Pasolin)
September 28, 6:30
Never released
Mandabi [The Money Order] (1968, Ousmane Sembène)
September 29, 9:30
Released 1970
One Fine Day [Un certo giorno] (1968, Ermanno Olmi)
September 30, 9:30
Never released
“Closing Night”: Oh! What a Lovely War (1969, Richard Attenborough)
October 2, 6:30
Released 1969

Ephemera

  • “The National Film Collection”: 23 programs of American films from the National Film Collection at the Library of Congress, shown at the Library and Museum of Performing Arts in Lincoln Center, all free
  • “Avant-Garde West”: 9 programs of films by West Coast filmmakers, shown at the Library and Museum of Performing Arts in Lincoln Center, all free
  • “Open Programs”: 15 programs of features and shorts of all categories, shown at the Library and Museum of Performing Arts in Lincoln Center, all free
  • “Jean Renoir: A One-Man Show”: a virtually complete retrospective of Renoir’s films, shown in five series at the Library & Museum of the Performing Arts in Lincoln Center

Recurring Directors
Key: films in this iteration excluding shorts/omnibus/retrospectives, films in this iteration including, films in the festival up to this point excluding, films up to this point including, number of gala spots (when applicable), number of festivals with more than one film shown (when applicable); † indicates their last appearance, fraction in parentheses indicates number of features shown from oeuvre, features released in the eligible timeframe, features in oeuvre

  • Jean-Luc Godard: 1/1/11/15/2/5
  • Robert Bresson: 1/1/4/4
  • Pier Paolo Pasolini: 1/1/2/4/0/1
  • Agnès Varda: 1/1/3/3/1
  • René Allio: 1/1/3/3†(3/10/10)
  • Bo Widerberg: 1/1/3/3
  • Ermanno Olmi: 1/1/2/2
  • Jaromil Jires: 1/1/1/2†(1/22/22)
  • Eric Rohmer: 1/1/1/2
  • Ingmar Bergman: 1/1/1/1
  • Walerian Borowczyk: 1/1/1/1
  • Marguerite Duras: 1/1/1/1
  • Nagisa Oshima: 1/1/1/1
  • Ousmane Sembène: 1/1/1/1
  • Max Ophuls: 0/1/0/2
  • Erich von Stroheim: 0/1/0/2

Recurring Countries
Key: films in this iteration excluding shorts/retrospectives, films in this iteration including, films in the festival up to this point excluding, films up to this point including, number of gala spots (when applicable)

  • France: 6/7/41/52/4
  • Sweden: 3/3/8/8
  • USA: 2/4/16/27/1
  • Italy: 2/2/16/20/1
  • Czechoslovakia: 2/2/11/13/3
  • UK: 2/2/8/10/1
  • Japan: 1/1/10/11/1
  • Hungary: 1/1/5/5
  • Senegal: 1/1/1/1

One-Time Directors

  • Richard Attenborough (gala)
  • Bill Duncalf
  • Judit Elek
  • Juraj Jakubisko
  • Paul Mazursky (gala)
  • Victor Sjöstrom (retrospective)
  • Susan Sontag

Feature Debuts

  • Richard Attenborough
  • Judit Elek
  • Paul Mazursky
  • Susan Sontag

Festivals

  • Cannes
    • Adalen 31 (Special Jury Prize)
    • My Night at Maud’s
    • Duet for Cannibals (Directors’ Fortnight)
    • Une femme douce (Directors’ Fortnight; also San Sebastian, Silver Seashell)
    • The Lady From Constantinople (Critics’ Week)
    • The Deserter and the Nomads (Out of Competition)
    • The Joke (?)
    • The Rite (?)
  • Berlin
    • Le Gai Savoir
  • Venice
    • Boy
    • Mandabi
  • N/A
    • Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
    • Destroy, She Said
    • The Epic That Never Was
    • Goto, Island of Love
    • HE Who Gets Slapped
    • Lions Love
    • The Merry Widow
    • Oh! What a Lovely War
    • One Fine Day
    • Pierre and Paul
    • Porcile
    • La Ronde

Oscar Nominees

  • Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice: Best Original Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Cinematography
  • My Night at Maud’s: Best Foreign Film, 1970 Best Original Screenplay
  • Adalen 31: Best Foreign Film

Events/Shorts

events
renoir events
shorts

Discussions By Length (Approximate)

  • 19:50 Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (22:57-42:47)
  • 14:57 My Night at Maud’s (2:12:44-2:27:41)
  • 14:35 Lions Love (1:45:41-2:00:16)
  • 13:35 Adalen 31 (1:22:03-1:35:38)
  • 12:20 Oh! What a Lovely War [One Person] (3:48:23-4:00:43)
  • 11:23 Boy (1:09:48-1:21:11)
  • 11:23 Destroy, She Said (2:48:05-2:59:18)
  • 11:13 La Ronde (2:01:30-2:12:43)
  • 10:59 Duet for Cannibals (2:37:05-2:48:04)
  • 10:24 Une femme douce (50:55-1:01:19)
  • 10:01 The Epic That Never Was (1:35:39-1:45:40)
  • 9:34 Mandabi (3:34:59-3:44:33)
  • 9:17 HE Who Gets Slapped (3:04:34-3:13:51)
  • 8:53 Le Gai Savoir (3:14:51-3:23:44)
  • 8:20 The Merry Widow (2:28:44-2:37:04)
  • 8:06 The Joke (42:48-50:54)
  • 7:17 The Rite (1:02:30-1:09:47)
  • 7:07 Porcile (3:27:51-3:34:58)
  • 5:14 Goto, Island of Love (2:59:19-3:04:33)
  • 4:05 The Deserter and the Nomads (3:23:45-3:27:50)
  • 3:48 One Fine Day (3:44:34-3:48:22)
  • 1:12 Pierre and Paul [Canceled] (2:00:17-2:01:29)
  • 1:09 The Lady From Constantinople [Canceled] (1:01:20-1:02:29)

Specifications

  • Paul Mazursky, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 105 minutes, 1.85:1, USA.
  • Jaromil Jires, Žert, 1969, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 80 minutes, 1.37:1, Czechoslovakia.
  • Robert Bresson, Une femme douce, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 88 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Judit Elek, Sziget a szárazföldön, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 79 minutes, 1.37:1, Hungary. (?)
  • Ingmar Bergman, Riten, 1969, 16 mm, black-and-white, sound, 72 minutes, 1.33:1, Sweden.
  • Nagisa Oshima, Shōnen, 1969, 35 mm, color and black-and-white, sound, 105 minutes, 2.35:1, Japan.
  • Bo Widerberg, Adalen 31, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 110 minutes, 2.35:1, Sweden.
  • Bill Duncalf, The Epic That Never Was, 1965, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 74 minutes, 1.37:1, UK.
  • Agnès Varda, Lions Love, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 110 minutes, 1.66:1, USA.
  • René Allio, Pierre et Paul, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 90 minutes, 1.66:1, France. (?)
  • Max Ophuls, La Ronde, 1950, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 93 minutes, 1.37:1, France.
  • Eric Rohmer, Ma nuit chez Maud, 1969, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 110 minutes, 1.37:1, France.
  • Erich von Stroheim, The Merry Widow, 1925, 35 mm, black-and-white, silent, 137 minutes, 1.33:1, USA.
  • Susan Sontag, Duett för kannibaler, 1969, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 105 minutes, 1.37:1, Sweden.
  • Marguerite Duras, Détruire, dit-elle, 1969, 35 mm, black-and-white, sound, 94 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Walerian Borowczyk, Goto, l’île d’amour, 1969, 16 mm, black-and-white and color, sound, 93 minutes, 1.66:1, France.
  • Victor Sjöström, HE Who Gets Slapped, 1924, 35 mm, black-and-white, silent, 80 minutes, 1.37:1, USA.
  • Jean-Luc Godard, Le Gai Savoir, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 95 minutes, 1.37:1, France.
  • Juraj Jakubisko, Zbehovia a pútnici, 1968, 35 mm, color, sound, 103 minutes, 1.37:1, Czechoslovakia.
  • Pier Paolo Pasolini, Porcile, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 99 minutes, 1.85:1, Italy.
  • Ousmane Sembène, Mandabi, 1968, 35 mm, color, sound, 90 minutes, 1.85:1, Senegal.
  • Ermanno Olmi, Un certo giorno, 1968, 35 mm, color, sound, 102 minutes, 1.37:1, Italy.
  • Richard Attenborough, Oh! What a Lovely War, 1969, 35 mm, color, sound, 144 minutes, 2.35:1, UK.

2018 Festival Dispatch #1 Show Notes

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Description
The first 2018 festival dispatch of the Catalyst and Witness podcast, devoted to exploring the films and format of the New York Film Festival, hosted by Ryan Swen and Dan Molloy. This covers the announcement of the 2018 main slate.

0:00-1:03:40 – Part One [The Favourite to Hotel by the River]
1:03:41-2:08:35 – Part Two [Roma to At Eternity’s Gate]

Housekeeping

  • Hosted by Dan Molloy & Ryan Swen
  • Conceived and Edited by Ryan Swen
  • Recorded in Los Angeles and Portland on MacBook GarageBand, Edited in Audacity
  • Podcast photograph from Yi Yi, Logo designed by Dan Molloy
  • Recorded August 10, 2018
  • Released August 11, 2018
  • Music (in order of appearance):
    • Breathless
    • Still Life
    • Phoenix